Where to Keep Your Savings When Interest Rates are Low

Saving might be a virtue, but it’s not one that the market tends to reward.

Even as interest rates in the economy as a whole have risen over the past few years, savings account interest rates generally haven’t followed suit.  Banks are quick to raise rates on things that make them money (such as interest rates on loans), but haven’t been nearly as quick to raise savings account rates.

Simply put, savings accounts are terrible right now.

Ask your parents or grandparents where they keep some of their spare cash, and they might tell you that rather than keep money in savings, they put money into Certificates of Deposit (CDs) or into a Money Market Account.  The only problem?  Those rates aren’t very good right now, either.

So, is all hope of earning some decent return on your savings lost? What’s the best place to keep your savings?  And how much do you really need to keep in your savings accounts?

[This article is one of a fourteen part ongoing series about the way managing your money changes when you get married that will be released from November 2017 to February 2018.  But, there’s no need to wait!  Click here to download your free Newlywed Money Checklist, that will walk you through each of the steps to take with your finances when you get married.  Click the link to get it today!]

You Need to Keep Some Money in Cash

Please don’t misinterpret “Savings accounts are terrible” to mean “You shouldn’t keep any money in savings”.  You should.

You need to keep enough money in savings to cover three to six months of living expenses, just in case you lose your job, your car breaks down, or you have unexpected health expenses.  There’s no getting around it, you need to have cash that you could access at a moment’s notice.

If both you and your spouse have good paying jobs or your fixed monthly expenses (like your rent or student loan payments) are relatively low, three months of spending is usually sufficient.  If your household only has one source of income, or your fixed expenses are relatively high, you should shoot to have six months of spending in a savings account.

Don’t Let That Number Scare You

Three to six months of living expenses is a big number.  If you don’t have that much money in savings today, it can seem like an impossible target to reach.

Rather than focusing on the end target, start by working toward something smaller. Instead, calculate your average spending for one month, and focus on saving that much.  Once you have that amount in the bank, try to double it.  And so on, until you reach your target savings about.

Start small, and focus on saving a month’s worth of expenses at a time.

Once You Have Your Emergency Fund Established, Keep it There

Once you’ve saved three to six months of living expenses, which we call your “emergency fund”, don’t keep adding to it.  Leave your emergency fund alone until you need to actually withdraw funds in a pinch.  (Of course, once the emergency is over, you’ll want to focus on building up this savings back up to three to six months of living expenses.)

But, you still should check in on this account from time to time.  Once or twice a year, you should review your budget to make sure that your spending hasn’t drastically changed.  If you’re spending more than you used to, you may need to add some money to your emergency fund, and vice versa.

In fact, most people will need to add to their emergency fund periodically over time.  Why?

Because savings accounts are terrible.

Simply put, the stuff we buy tends to get more expensive faster than banks raise interest rates on savings accounts. Long term inflation (the rate that prices rise) is around 3% per year in the US.  If the money in your savings account only earns 0.2% interest per year, you’re essentially losing money by keeping money in a savings account.

Which is why it’s so important to review your spending and add to your emergency fund as needed so you could still cover three to six months worth of expenses if you had to.

Beyond Emergencies

We’ve talked about why I don’t like savings accounts, but also why you need to use them anyway for your emergency fund.  We’ll talk through ways to make the most of savings accounts in a bit.

But what about the rest of your money?  Once you have your emergency fund, where should you be putting your savings?

It Depends on When You’re Going to Spend Your Savings

When deciding what to do with your non-emergency savings, the first question you need to answer is, “What’s it for?”  Are you saving money for a down payment on a house in a year or two, or for something more long term?

Unfortunately, finding a place for your money that will earn a higher rate of return than savings accounts will involve taking risk.  And as a general rule, the sooner you actually need the money, the less risk you should take with it.

For example, I usually recommend that most people in their 20s and 30s invest almost all of their retirement savings in the stock market using low cost mutual funds. These are relatively high-risk investments, but they also produce much higher average expected returns every year. If your retirement account were to drop in value by 20%, you might certainly be upset… but since you aren’t going to retire for several more decades, it wouldn’t be catastrophic since you have plenty of time to earn the money back.

However, if you were planning on using your savings to buy a house a year from today, and your savings were to drop in value by 20%, this would be a much bigger deal for you since you’d have much less time to earn the money back.  While long term growth rates in the stock market tend to be good, they can and do fluctuate up and down in the short term.

All of this is a long way of saying:  when deciding what to do with money you’ve saved beyond your emergency fund, the primary thing to consider is when you’re going to spend the money.  The longer you want to keep the money saved, the more risk you can afford to take.

Some Rules of Thumb

Now that we’ve discussed how to think about risk with the money you have saved, consider the following options for your short and longer-term savings.  There are pros and cons to each of these strategies that you should consider before making a decision- if you have any questions about these strategies, shoot me an email.

Short Term Savings (You Expect to Spend the Money in 0 – 2 Years)

For short term savings, you should take as little risk as possible to minimize your risk of loss in the account.  If you’re still up to take some risk, you might consider investing 20% of your short-term savings into stock mutual funds, and the other 80% into bond mutual funds.  This portfolio mix will still fluctuate with the market, but it should offer you a decent expected long run return.

Better yet, you might consider only investing in bond mutual funds and skipping the stock component altogether.  Bond funds still go up and down in value like stocks, but tend to be less volatile in most environments.  A money market mutual fund could also work well, but will offer a lower expected return (in exchange for less volatility).

If you’re looking for places to put your money that don’t pose a substantial threat to drop in value, you could consider a short term individual savings bond or a CD that matures by the time you need to withdraw the money. While rates on these vehicles tend to be relatively low, they are still a safe place to put your savings.  And particularly for 2 year CDs, rates tend to be much better than you’ll get on a savings account.  But, beware:  using either of these investment option, you’re tying your money up for the full term of the bond or CD.  If you buy a 2 year CD, you shouldn’t plan on taking the money out of the CD until the full two years are up.

Finally, particularly if you are looking to use your money in the next few months, you may be stuck keeping your savings in cash.  We’ll talk about ways to improve your returns on these types of funds shortly.

Medium and Long-Term Savings Goals

While any of the short-term strategies I described above could be used for longer term savings goals, I recommend investing your longer-term money into stock and bond mutual funds.  A longer-term CD or individual bond could work for you, but you’ll likely be better off putting your money into the market.

Since stock mutual funds offer more risk and more reward than bond funds, the longer you are looking to invest for, the higher the percentage of your investments should be in stock funds.

For example, if you are looking to buy a house in five years, you might consider investing 50% of your money for this goal into stock mutual funds, and 50% of your money into bond funds.  If you’re looking to invest for your newborn child’s college education, you might invest 80% of your savings into stock mutual funds, and 20% into bond funds.  And if you’re saving for your retirement that’s 35 years away, you might invest 100% of your retirement savings into stocks.

One final note about this, though.  As you get closer and closer to realizing these longer-term goals, you want to make sure that you gradually shift your investments into more conservative positions, all else being equal.  If you want to buy a house five years from now and you decide to invest your savings 50/50 in stocks and bonds, as you get closer to the point in time when you want to buy a house, you should shift your account away from the stock funds and into more bond funds or CDs.

This is All Well and Good, but Where Do I Keep My Cash?

You know the options for where to put your savings beyond your emergency fund, but that still leaves us with the same fundamental problem we had at the beginning.

If savings accounts are terrible, is there another option for where we can keep our emergency fund and maybe even our savings for our short-term savings goals?

The answer is, “sort of”.

Ditch the Traditional Savings Account and Open a High Yield Savings Account

Like just about everything else in our lives, the internet has drastically altered the landscape of personal finance options.  A few decades ago, you would have needed to work with a stockbroker to invest in a stock or mutual fund.  Now, you can open up an account at TD Ameritrade and place a trade on your own with just a few clicks of a button.

The same thing has happened with savings accounts.  A few years ago, you had no other option than to keep your savings with the local branch of a national bank, or maybe a more regional bank or credit union.

No longer.

Over the past decade, several banks have opened high yield savings accounts.  These aren’t banks that you could go to visit in person; instead, they operate 100% online as a way to keep their costs low.  This, in turn, allows them to pay significantly higher interest rates than the traditional savings banks.

Three of my favorite high yield savings accounts are

As of this writing, all three of these banks paid the same interest rate and they have been regularly raising their rates over the past few years.  They also have no monthly fees associated with them, and are FDIC insured.

Best yet, the interest rate on these accounts is literally over 4,000% higher than the interest rate paid on a Bank of America savings account at the time of this writing.

Most savings accounts just aren’t good in today’s interest rate environment.  And even with high yield savings accounts, I still don’t recommend keeping your medium- and long-term savings in one of these accounts.

But, if you’re looking to get a higher return on your emergency fund and even your short-term goal savings, a high yield savings account is the first place I’d start.

How to Take Control of Your Finances after Graduation

[Don’t miss the two free giveaways in this post!  Click here to access our new retirement calculator, and click here to download our comprehensive student loan guide!]

The first 90 degree day of the year (at least here in Philadelphia) means a lot of things to different people.  Memorial Day Weekend.  Weekends at the park or pool.  And, of course, graduation season.

Congratulations to everyone in Class of 2017! If you are finishing your undergraduate career this month, welcome to the working world!  If you are finishing a masters or professional degree program, congratulations on finally (probably?) being doing with school!  And if you didn’t graduate this year, stick around anyway- I have some information here for you, too.

As the excitement of your graduation weekend ends and you begin to take the next steps on your journey, whatever they may be, I recommend that you take a step back and take an assessment of your current financial landscape.  Your life is changing (for the better!), and as such, you should take some time to reflect and take action to set yourself up for financial success in your new endeavors.

There’s a lot to take in here – if you have any challenges in any of these areas, I recommend that you reach out to schedule a free consultation about a one time, quick start session!

Congratulations again, and let me know how you are doing as you progress through this list!

Negotiate Your Salary

If you’re still working on lining up your first job out of school, make sure you prepare yourself to negotiate your salary before you accept a job.  If you already have a job lined up, file this one away for your next performance review.

I’ve discussed this in much more detail before, but it’s absolutely critical that you negotiate your salary when starting a new job.

Over 60% of millennials aren’t negotiating with employers at all regarding their salary.  And the worst part?  Three out of four employers have room to negotiate salary by as much as 10%- but only if you ask for it.  And, truthfully, hiring managers and HR are expecting you ask for it.

I know it’s uncomfortable, but you have to do it.

Set a Student Loan Paydown Plan

The bad news? T-minus six months until your first student loan payment is due.

The worse news? The vast majority of millennials are told by their loan servicer how much they owe and automatically start paying the bill, without double checking to make sure they’re paying down their loans in the smartest way possible.

The good news?  You have the power in your hands to make sure you’re handling your student loans with the care they deserve.

I highly recommend downloading my free guide on managing student loan payments. In it, you will learn:

  • How to review each of your student loans and determine what payment plans each is eligible for.
  • How to know if you are eligible for a loan forgiveness program, and what you need to do to qualify for the program under current law.
  • When you should refinance your student loans, and when you absolutely should NOT refinance your loans.
  • How to set goals around your student loan payment strategy (i.e., should you try to pay down your loans as fast as possible, or should you try to minimize your monthly payment?)
  • … and much, much more!

Go ahead and grab your free copy of “13 Steps to Take Before You Make Your Next Student Loan Payment” today.  It will be worth your while to work through the guide in order to set you up for success with your student loans.

Set Financial Goals for the Next Five Years

I remember graduating college like it was yesterday.  The last thing I wanted to do was to try to imagine what the future was going to be like.  I just had the best four years of my life, and was scared to face all of the responsibilities that I knew would fall on my shoulders in the real world.  If you had told me back then to spend some time setting goals for my first few years in the working world, I probably would have laughed at you.

But, I wish I had taken that advice.  I’ve improved my own personal financial situation significantly after I started setting financial goals for myself. (Not too long after I started my first job, luckily!)  And I recommend you do the same.

Take some time and imagine what you want your life to be like in one, three, and five years from now.  Will you be going back to school to get a graduate or professional degree?  Do you want to buy a new car or, a little while down the line, a new house? Are you gunning for a quick promotion at work, or maybe even thinking about launching a business or side hustle someday?

All of these things are great, and they are much more likely to happen if you (literally) put pen to paper to clearly articulate what you want your life to look like.  And, once you have done this, you can manage your finances accordingly to begin to make progress against these goals.

Set Up Your 401(k)

It can be easy, in the flurry of paperwork that accompanies a new job, to accidentally forget or neglect to set up contributions to your 401(k).  Don’t forget, it’s critically important.  At a minimum, you should contribute at least to your firm’s matching point.

So, if your firm matches up to 3% of your salary, you should contribute, at a bare minimum, 3% to your 401(k).  Not contributing up to your firm’s matching point is, quite literally, turning down free money.

And unfortunately, it’s not enough just to set up how much you want to contribute to your 401(k).  You need to choose how you’d like to invest the money you put into your retirement plan, too.

Unfortunately, firms usually give very little guidance to their employees on how to do this.  Which is why I’ve wrote about how to choose investments in your 401(k) in more detail on this blog.

…And If You Can, Save Beyond The Minimum for Retirement

Retirement might be a long way away (spoiler alert: it is a long way away), but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t start saving aggressively for it now.  In fact, due to the beautiful thing that is compound interest, the more you save for retirement in your early working years, the much better your retirement picture will be.

There are other things you should be saving for as well (we’ll get to that in a bit), but if you have some discretionary income, I can’t recommend highly enough that you put some of that into a retirement account.  What type of retirement account – either increasing contributions to your 401(k), opening a Traditional IRA, opening a Roth IRA, or even a nonretirement investment account – can vary significantly depending on your circumstances. This is probably something we should talk one on one about, if you have questions.

If you’re wondering how much you should be saving for retirement, I recommend inputting your data into the free retirement calculator I have right here on my website.  And, particularly, if there’s a big gap between the yellow and blue lines or if you portfolio is projected to run out in the early stages of your retirement, we should talk about ways to close the gap.

Build an Emergency Fund

Like I said, retirement isn’t the only thing you should be saving for.  It’s critical that you gradually build an emergency fund so that if you were to lose your job, you have a way to support yourself during the transition.

The rule of thumb is that you should have enough saved to support yourself for six months (living on reduced expenses, of course – you probably won’t spend as much as you are today if you don’t have an income, after all).  But, when you’re first getting started, I think it’s silly to dwell on six months of savings.  That’s a pretty big and intimidating number for most people.

So instead, start by trying to save up to cover one month of your minimum living expenses.  Once you’ve saved that much, make your next goal to be to save an additional month of living expenses.  And so on, until you’ve hit that six month goal.  By breaking it up into pieces like this, it gives you a very clear way to take small steps, starting now, to work your way up to this major goal in the future.

Keep Your Living Expenses at College-Level For As Long As You Can

If you’re like me, there’s a good part of you that’s sad to be leaving college.  College is hard, sure, but it’s fun!

Do you have that same bittersweet feeling I did about leaving school behind as you enter the real world?  Good!  Hold on to it.  Embrace it.  And channel it into how you manage your finances.

Simply put, if you had a blast in college living on a minimal income, there’s no reason to change that up now that you have a salary.

Sure, you can have some peace of mind that you have some discretionary money at your disposal if you ever were to need it. And there’s certainly nothing wrong with splurging every now and then.

But, since you’re used to keeping your living expenses low, you should continue to do that as much as possible.  Have friends in your new hometown?  Try to get them to sign on as roommates!   Have some more free time on the weekends now that you’re not constantly writing papers and completing homework?  Spend a little of that time learning how to cook so you don’t need to order takeout seven or eight times a week.

Simply put, it’s much easier to maintain your current standard of living today than it is to increase your standard of living, realize you’re overspending, and then try to cut spending back.  You’re better off keeping your monthly spending where it is today, and saving the rest, rather than allowing your lifestyle costs to rise with your income.

And Speaking of Spending…

Yes, you need a budget for yourself.

I’m not the type of person to go through my clients (or my own) spending with a fine-toothed comb, analyzing every little expense here and there.  It’s not fun; it’s not productive; and it’s not an effective, long term, healthy way to manage your finances.

Instead, you should set budget parameters for yourself to make sure you know where your money is going, and track against those.  A free tool like www.mint.com is great for this.

You don’t need to worry if you go a dollar or two over any particular budget category each month.  But, you should pay close attention to your biggest spending areas, and try to find ways to cut back on these highest impact spending areas first, if you’re having a hard time finding the money to save for retirement and build your emergency fund.

Budgeting should be a common-sense driven exercise.  Don’t drive yourself crazy with it, but know your budget numbers and stick to them as best you can.

Increase Your Available Credit (But Don’t Use It)

It can be hard to build your credit score while you’re in college.  After all, most financial institutions aren’t in the business of giving huge lines of credit to college students who have a minimal, if any, income.

But now that you’re out of school, that changes in a big way.  As soon as you have documentable proof of income, you should open up a credit card and use it wisely to start to build your credit score.

Whatever the bank gives you for a credit limit, always keep your credit card balance below 30% of this limit.  Always pay off your bill every month.  In other words, don’t rely on your credit card to bail you out if you don’t have the cash available to make a purchase.  Instead, use it as a tool to begin to build your credit history as an excellent manager of credit.  When you’re ready to buy a house several years down the line, you’ll be happy you did.

An even better way to do this?  Find a credit card that offers some great perks. If you like to travel, find a card that gives good points toward airfare or hotel stays.  If you’d rather just have the cash, find a card that pays you cash back bonuses when you use the card.  There are a lot of options out there, and some of them are fantastic.  If you want to get some more ideas on great credit cards to use, give me a call.

This Isn’t a One-Time Thing

As you can tell, there’s a LOT here.  As you transition in the work force, it’s ultimately on you to set yourself up for financial success.

Start today by downloading my free student loan guide and plugging your numbers into my retirement calculator.  Create a budget, open a credit card, and manage your cash flow (both income and spending) wisely.

But ultimately, most of these things aren’t just for when you make the transition from school to a job.  You should periodically review each of these items to make sure you’re still on track.  Set up a free call with me to talk through how we can implement a system to address each of these items, and more.

Should You Buy Snapchat Stock?

No.

No, you shouldn’t.

Unlike a lot of financial planners out there, I love to invest in individual stocks.  I typically include some individual stocks in a portion of my clients’ portfolios, in addition to widely diversified, low-cost ETFs or index funds.

But that being said, you need a strategy for choosing which stocks to buy.  And quite frankly, IPO stocks should rarely, if ever, fit that strategy.

What is an IPO?

IPO stands for Initial Public Offering.  In other words, a stock’s IPO is the process by which the company issues its first shares of stock to the public.

The stock in question- Snapchat- has their IPO set for Thursday, March 2.  In other words, starting on 3/2, you’ll be able to own shares of Snapchat stock.  The starting share price is expected to be $17 per share.  However, this IPO price is only good for the second the stock launches.  After that, it will trade based on the supply and demand of the stock market. And be warned- typically, prices can be very volatile immediately after an IPO.

Up until this point, Snapchat was a private company. But now, if you buy shares of Snapchat stock (the stock ticker symbol is “SNAP”), you’ll be able to participate in their future growth.

If the value of the company continues to grow over time, you’ll be able to earn money based on the growth if you buy some of the stock.  On the other hand, if the company struggles, you could end up losing money.

Investing in IPOs Has a Mixed Track Record- At Best

So, why shouldn’t you buy SNAP shares on Thursday (March 2)? I’m not a big believer in speculating what’s going to happen in the stock market.  There’s certainly a decent chance that Snapchat will grow quickly in the next few years.  But, historically speaking, IPOs tend to have a poor track record.

Take a look at the historical stock prices of a few big companies that had highly publicized IPOs in the few years following their debut: Facebook, Twitter, Visa, Alibaba, and Groupon:

Facebook

Twitter

Visa

Alibaba

Groupon

Notice a trend here?

Some of these stocks have done incredibly well over a long time period- Facebook and Visa in particular.  But on the other hand, Groupon is still struggling today- as of this writing, its current price  is 84 percent lower than the trading price immediately after it went public.

In the short term, IPOs tend to be very volatile in price.  More often than not, the market views the stock as overvalued when it is initially launched.  For this reason alone, I don’t recommend buying shares of just about anything the day it’s released.  Snapchat included.

Of course, past market performance doesn’t necessarily reflect what will happen in the future.  And even people who bought Facebook when it debuted, and held it through today, have done very well.  But frankly, this misses the broader point.  I view investing in stocks like SNAP as a gamble- it could pay off, or you might lose big.  I prefer an alternative method to gambling in the stock market…

You Need an Investing Strategy and Methodology

I don’t recommend that you invest in companies by chasing the proverbial shiny object.  Instead, set some investing goals for yourself, and use a methodology to help guide your investments to meet these goals.

What are you trying to accomplish with your investments?  How much risk are you willing to take?  How long will you keep the money invested?  If your investments were to fall by 10 or 20 or 30 percent, what would you do?  These are critical questions that you need to ask yourself to guide what investing strategy you should follow.

If your goal is to build long term wealth through your investments, I’d posit that taking a bet on a company like Snapchat might not be the best idea.  Even if it does happen to double or triple in value in the next ten years, the risk associated with an IPO like this might not make it a good choice for your long-term strategy.

Instead, I like to focus on stocks that a) have good, long track records, b) pay a steady, reliable income, c) have a history of growing this income every year, and d) appear to be well positioned for the future.  Investing in companies like this, done correctly and monitoring and adjusting your portfolio as market situations change, will position you well for long term success.

And, of course, don’t forget the need to diversify.  No matter how good a particular stock looks, you should never have more than 5% of your total investments be in any particular company.

I’m going to be sharing a lot more about this sort of framework on my upcoming webinar next week.  Register today!

And in the meantime, think long and hard before investing in a new stock like Snapchat.  Don’t gamble in the stock market- develop your investing framework, and stick to it!

What Do I Do With My 401(k) When I Leave My Job?

The average millennial changes jobs four times before they reach the age of 32.  Generally speaking, this is a great thing from a financial perspective- salary tends to go up whenever you change jobs.

There are a few situations that can arise when we hop from job to job, though.  For example, what should you do with your 401(k) once you leave a job behind?  Too often, this step gets lost in the shuffle, and it can be easy to lose track of these accounts if you aren’t careful.  So, what should you do with your employer-sponsored retirement account once you leave?

Four Options

There are typically four options that you can pursue.  There’s no universal right or wrong answer here (although one option is significantly worse than the others). But, the most important thing is to develop a system to keep track of these accounts as you move from job to job.  I have a dedicated framework that can help with this- and I’m sharing it for free on my webinar on March 7.  The bottom line- whatever you do, make sure you are able to keep track of where all of your retirement accounts are!

With that being said, let’s discuss the four options in detail.

The Two Not-So-Good Options

Your first option is to cash out your 401(k).  As in, when you leave your current job, you technically can withdraw all of the money from your 401(k) to spend it today.

That being said, this is generally a terrible idea.  Retirement accounts should be kept until you’re ready to, you know, retire.  And, you’ll pay a hefty tax penalty by cashing out of your 401(k) early.  Just because it’s technically one of your four options, doesn’t mean you should actually do it.

Your second option is to leave it with your old employer.  There are some employers that force you to move it to an IRA if it’s a small account, but in most cases you can leave your old 401(k) with your old job.

That being said, there are a few reasons I typically don’t recommend this approach:

  • This is probably the easiest way to lose track of your account. If you leave all of your 401(k)s at old jobs, it can become difficult to monitor all of them.  And, of course, you really should be keeping an eye on your investments over time and adjusting them as you get closer to retirement.  As you have more and more 401(k)s, it can be harder to keep tabs on all of your different investments if they are scattered across account with your old employers.
  • Typically, employers charge fees on 401(k)s for people who are no longer employed with their company. Why pay that fee, that you aren’t getting any service for, if you don’t have to?

If your old 401(k) has great, low cost investments, it might not be a bad idea to keep your account there, but that generally is the only time I recommend this.

The Two Better Options

Two options down, two to go.  And luckily, these options are typically better.

Your third option is to consolidate your old 401(k) into your new one, if your new employer will let you.  The idea here is simple- why have two accounts to keep track of when you could combine them all into one account?  Moving your old 401(k) balance into your new job’s 401(k) is a great way to streamline your accounts.

This doubly goes if the fund options in your new 401(k) are good ones.  If you have good investment options that have low fees associated with them in your new 401(k), combining the two accounts is a no brainer.  You’ll be limited to the funds available in your company’s plan, but if they’re good, that might not matter too much.

Unfortunately, many 401(k)s use high fee accounts that can really eat into your retirement returns over time, and you aren’t getting anything in return for the fee you’re paying.  Which leads us to option four:

You can move your 401(k) into an IRA.  To do this, you’ll need to open up a brand-new IRA for yourself (unless you have one already, of course), and then request your former employer to transfer the balance to your new IRA.  You’ll then need to select the investments you’ll want to use in your IRA, and monitor their performance over time.

A few notes here:

  • When you request your old employer to move the funds to your IRA, make sure they know that you’re moving it to an IRA. Moving a 401(k) to an IRA is not taxable, but if they think you are just withdrawing your 401(k) to your bank account, you’ll need to pay a penalty to the IRS.  So, make sure they address the transfer to your IRA.
  • Make sure the account is a Traditional or Rollover IRA, not a Roth IRA. Transferring a 401(k) to a Roth IRA will cause you to be taxed on the entire balance of the account.  This can be beneficial for some people, but you definitely want to consult with a financial planner before you do this.  The key point- make sure that you don’t open up a Roth IRA by mistake!
  • One of the benefits of moving a 401(k) to an IRA is that you have full freedom over the investments in the account. You aren’t limited to a few funds in your 401(k), you can choose anything.  But, taking this approach means that you’ll need to screen your investments and rebalance your accounts over time.  I’d be happy to chat about this if you have any questions about how to do this.
How to Decide between Consolidating and Transferring to an IRA?

So, let’s take it for granted that you’re trying to decide between the last two options- combining your 401(k)s, or moving your old 401(k) to an IRA.  How should you go about making this decision?  A few key things to consider:

What are you Paying in Fees?- there are some great 401(k)s out there, but unfortunately, many of them aren’t so great.  Many 401(k) accounts only have a few funds to invest in, and they tend to have high fees associated with them.

Use a site like www.personalfund.com to evaluate how much you are paying for fees in your 401(k). If your new 401(k) has a lot of low fee options, it might make sense to combine.  If you have a lot of high fee options, it probably makes sense to go with the IRA.

Do you Need Help? Do you feel ok self-managing your investments, or do you want the help of a professional?  Most financial planners don’t provide direct investment advice on 401(k)s (although I do!), so if you want some help with your investments, usually you’ll need to move it to an IRA.  But keep in mind, that will come with an extra cost.

On the other hand, if you feel confident managing your investments yourself, you could pick either route.  It’s just a matter of which funds you’d like to invest in.  Speaking of which…

What Funds are Available?  As I’ve alluded to multiple times, 401(k)s typically provide some convenient funds to invest in, but they tend to be limited and higher in cost.  If you want a more extensive investment option, including stocks and index funds, you should probably move to an IRA.

There’s No Universally Right Answer

Ultimately, when you review the items listed above, you might find that you probably can’t go wrong between options 3 and 4.  It all comes down to personal preference, and how much you care about investment options and fees.  Ultimately, do your homework, and you should be able to sleep soundly with your decision.

And if you have further questions about retirement preparation, sign up for my webinar on March 7th to discuss these strategies in more detail!

 

How to Allocate Your Money Effectively

[Click here to register for my webinar, “How To Organize Your Finances and Create a Roadmap Toward Financial Freedom”!]

Ever since I founded Pacesetter Planning, I’ve worked with my clients on a wide range of financial topics.  I’ve gotten a variety of questions from clients and potential clients, and while everyone’s situation is a little different, generally they fall into the following categories:

  • How do I manage my finances with my husband/wife/fiance/significant other?
  • How much do I need to buy a house?
  • How much should I be saving for retirement?
  • How do I select investments?
  • Should I put extra money toward my student loans or should I direct that money elsewhere?

As you may have noticed, I’ve addressed a good number of these topics at a high level on this blog already (and will continue to do so).  But, you may have picked up on something else.

All of these Questions are Interconnected

It’s hard to make financial decisions in a vacuum.  Often times, the hard part isn’t answering these individual questions, but finding the right answer to them all at the same time.  It often isn’t practical to increase your saving for retirement and buy a house and pay extra on your student loans all at once.  These decisions need to be made together, and there’s usually not a clear right or wrong answer.

That, of course, is where I come in.  I help my clients develop plans to manage their finances, prioritize their goals, and help them allocate their money accordingly.  We set targets and track progress against these goals, updating as needed.

You Need a Framework to Make these Decisions

While everyone’s circumstances are a little bit different, I use a strict framework and process to help clients make these decisions.

And I’d like to share it with all of you.

On Tuesday, March 7 at 8 PM EST, I’ll be hosting a free webinar called “How to Organize Your Finances and Create A Roadmap Toward Financial Freedom”. You can register for the webinar here.

On this webinar, we’ll discuss:

  • How I recommend clients structure their accounts to keep track of their finances
  • How to implement a system to manage your income month to month to pay yourself first
  • How much money you’ll need to retire, and what it will take to get there
  • How to balance your everyday spending with your short and long term financial goals
We Face Greater Financial Challenges than our Parents and Grandparents.  Plan Accordingly.

Sometimes I get pushback when I say this, but I truly believe that millennials face much greater challenges than previous generations.  Think about it for a minute.

Most of our grandparents worked 40 years at the same job, retired and received a pension from their company to fund their retirement.  They have Social Security.  When they were our age and looking to buy a home, housing prices were about twice the average annual salary.

Many of our parents may have had multiple jobs over the course of their careers, but most of them only had one job at a time.  Some of them may still have a pension, but all will (barring some sort of catastrophe) receive Social Security.  And again, the average home price when they were in their twenties was around twice the average annual salary.

Now?  The average millennial changes jobs four times before turning 32. More than 1/3 of millennials have a side job.  The average price for a home has jumped to about 3.5x the average annual salary. Most of us have some type of student loans.

Pensions? Social Security?   ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

We have some big challenges ahead of us.  The good news is that these challenges can be beaten.  But, you need a method and a plan to get you there.  I’ve got it for you.

I Want to Teach You Everything I Know

I didn’t get into financial planning to only work with rich clients.  My goal is to help make all of my clients wealthy someday.  The more people I can help, the better.

Sign up for my upcoming webinar, and let me know if you have any questions you think I should address.  I look forward to sharing my methodology with you all.

How to Pick Investments in Your 401(k)

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before.

You get a new job, go in for your first day, excited to get started.  Six hours into an eight hour onboarding training, you get a packet from HR with a 40 page document about your 401(k).  And, for the most part, you’re essentially left to set it up on your own.

You dig a little deeper and set up a certain percentage of your paycheck to go into your 401(k) directly. Now, it’s time to select the funds in which to invest.  The million dollar question- where in the world to start?

I’ve seen plans have as many as 50 different funds options to choose from. And most plans give very little guidance on how to make your decision.  So, what do you do?

A Very, Very Brief Primer on Mutual Funds

This probably warrants its own separate post, but before we talk about how to choose a fund, it’s important to know what exactly you’re choosing.

The funds available in a 401(k) are mutual funds.  There are a wide variety of mutual funds, but the general idea is the same across the board.  If you put $10,000 in a mutual fund, the manager of the fund will invest it into a wide variety of stocks and bonds.  The fund manager then reallocates these investments over time according to the fund’s objectives.  When you wish to withdraw your money, you recieve your portion of the funds growth (or losses).

Mutual funds are a great way to diversify your money.  When you put your money into a mutual fund, you aren’t just buying a single company’s stock.  Generally, you’re putting your money into hundreds of stocks and bonds within a single fund.

Every mutual fund has a different objective, and risk level.  On one end of the spectrum, some funds only invest in smaller companies in Africa and Asia.  These are considered very high risk/high reward investments.  On the other end, some mutual funds only invest in US Government bonds. In turn, these are very low risk funds (that in turn, offer much less upside potential). Most funds are somewhere in between.

Your 401(k) Investments Should Be Fairly Aggressive Early in Your Career

There’s no right answer for exactly how much risk you should take with your investments.  The amount of risk you take generally depends on two things- how much risk you want to take, and how long your money will be invested.

This second piece is the key here.  Your time horizon for how long your money will be invested can sometimes override your risk preference.  For example, even if you are a very aggressive investor who wants to take a lot of risk,  it’s not a good idea to invest that money aggressively if you are planning on using your investments to buy a house in six months.  If the market were to crash, you might not have enough money to buy that house.

The flip side is also true.  If you’re investing for a long time, it probably makes sense to take more risk in your investments.

For millennials, the biggest risk to your retirement assets doesn’t have anything to do with the stock market at all.  The biggest risk is inflation.

To phrase it differently, inflation has averaged around 3% every year.  Meaning, that every year, the things you buy tend to get about 3% more expensive.  If your investments for retirement aren’t at least keeping up with inflation, you’re essentially losing money.  The investment risk for a retirement portfolio that averages 6-8% a year is well worth it. Particularly because a “less risky” portfolio averaging a 2-4% return could leave you with less money, inflation adjusted, than what you have today.

All of this is a long way of saying- if you’re in your 20s, you want to make sure you focus your investments on growth to maximize the portfolio’s value by the time you retire.  Swings in value in your 20s and 30s are a small price to pay to beat inflation over time.

…But As You Grow Older, Make Your Retirement Accounts More Conservative

Just because a growth-focused 401(k) portfolio is right for you now, doesn’t mean it always will be.  As you get older, shift some of your portfolio from stock funds to bond funds.

A good rule of thumb is to move 10% of your account from stocks to bonds every 10 years.  That way, by the time you retire, your portfolio is likely to have a good mix of growth and income-focused investments, varying slightly depending on how much risk you’re comfortable with.

So, How Should You Invest? You Have Two Major Options

With all that being said, what funds should you choose in your 401(k)?  While all plans offer different fund choices, you generally have two options:

  1. Retirement Target Date Funds

Almost all plans have retirement date target funds.  The name of these funds varies from institution to institution, but they generally contain “Retirement” or “Target Date” in the name, followed by a suggested retirement year.

If you decide to go this route, choose the fund that corresponds with your expected retirement date.  The target retirement dates are typically stated in five year increments.  For example, a 25-year-old expecting to retire in about 40 years might choose the “Retirement Target 2055”, since 2055 is about 40 years from the current year.

These funds can be a great option for one simple reason: simplicity.  All of the stuff I describe above about how your investments should start out focused on growth, and become more conservative over time?  Target date retirement funds do it all for you.

Target date retirement funds are designed to be, in theory, the only fund you “need” in your portfolio.  They are well diversified, automatically rebalance, and become more conservative over time.

The only problem?  They can be expensive.  All mutual funds have some sort of cost associated with them that come out of your account.  Typically, since target date retirement funds do this work for you, they can be much more expensive than other fund options in your portfolio. This could leave you with tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars less when you retire.

I recommend doing a cost analysis of the different fund options in your portfolio using a site like www.personalfund.com.  Or, I’d be happy to conduct a 401(k) review to make sure you aren’t leaving money on the table.

  1. Build Your Own Portfolio

If you want more control, or lower fees, on your retirement accounts, you can build your own portfolio.  The great news with this option is that it allows you to customize the portfolio to your liking using the funds available. And, this method typically costs less in those ongoing fees I mentioned above.

If you go this route, you need to make sure you choose anywhere from four to ten or so funds that span the various sectors of the financial markets.  You want to have some exposure to large US companies and small ones.  You should have a certain percentage of your portfolio in foreign stocks.  And adding anywhere from 10-30% of your portfolio in bond funds is a good idea too.

If cost is the downside of the retirement date funds, complexity is the downside to this second approach. How you allocate your investments has a huge impact on your long term portfolio returns.  You therefore want to make sure you have your funds weighted appropriately.

And, unlike with the target date retirement funds, you need to worry about keeping your funds balanced over time.  What do I mean by this?  Hypothetically, let’s say you choose two mutual funds for your 401(k)  putting 80% of your 401(k) into the XYZ Company Stock Fund, and 20% into the XYZ Company Bond Fund. (Obviously, I made these funds these up to illustrate the concept.  And, you probably will want to have more than two funds if you aren’t using a target date retirement fund.  But, let’s keep it simple for now).  Now, let’s say that this year, stocks have a bad year, and bonds have a relatively good year (again, all hypothetical).  At the end of the year, even though you started 80% stocks/20% bonds, your portfolio might be 65% stocks/35% bonds, since the value of the stocks fell and the bonds rose.

When you are managing individual funds, you need to keep an eye on the portfolio being thrown out of balance in this way.  Typically, I recommend logging into your 401(k) twice a year and rebalancing to bring the portfolio back to 80%/20%, or whatever weighting you choose, to make sure it stays in line with your overall investment objectives.

In practice, once you have the portfolio set up appropriately, it isn’t that hard to rebalance it twice a year.  But, it a) takes a bit of time, and b) involves remembering to do it.  For this reason, I include rebalancing my clients 401(k)s twice a year as part of my comprehensive financial planning package.

Conclusion

You ultimately have two options- use the readymade target retirement funds, and pay a higher cost, or select the funds yourself and manage them independently.  There ultimately isn’t a “right” answer for everyone across the board.  And of course, if you have further questions about your investment options, how to rebalance, or even just to get a second opinion, I’m only a call away.